Best quotes from Zuckerberg: What Facebook's CEO told Congress about privacy, politics, regulation and more

Apr 11, 2018

 

In case you missed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's first of two days testifying before congressional committees, or just need a refresher of what the 33-year-old billionaire told lawmakers, check out the gallery above.

Zuckerberg testified before a joint Senate committee hearing Tuesday, answering questions about the Menlo Park-based company's handling of user data, the week after it increased its estimate of how many people had their data improperly accessed and harvested by the Donald Trump-connected political consultancy Cambridge Analytica to 87 million, from 50 million.

Senators grilled him on whether Facebook is a monopoly, how it ensures user privacy and how it plans to stop foreign meddling in elections around the globe via its platform, which has more than 2 billion users worldwide.

“We are going through a broad philosophical shift at the company,” said Zuckerberg, who eschewed his signature grey T-shirt for a dark suit and tie for his week on Capitol Hill.

The company's stock jumped 4.5 percent — its best single-day performance in two years — on Tuesday, signaling that investors were pleased with how the proceedings went. Shares dipped slightly at the opening bell on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Zuckerberg will take his explanations about what happened with Cambridge Analytica, how Facebook is dealing with fake news and Russian interference, the company's business model, how it works with third-party developers and much more to the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Facebook is one of Silicon Valley's largest technology employers, with almost 10,000 workers in the region at last count. Around the world, it has about 25,000. Zuckerberg has said it plans to hire thousands more cybersecurity workers to tackle data privacy issues, but that may be easier said than done.

In case you missed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's first of two days testifying before congressional committees, or just need a refresher of what the 33-year-old billionaire told lawmakers, check out the gallery above.

Zuckerberg testified before a joint Senate committee hearing Tuesday, answering questions about the Menlo Park-based company's handling of user data, the week after it increased its estimate of how many people had their data improperly accessed and harvested by the Donald Trump-connected political consultancy Cambridge Analytica to 87 million, from 50 million.

Senators grilled him on whether Facebook is a monopoly, how it ensures user privacy and how it plans to stop foreign meddling in elections around the globe via its platform, which has more than 2 billion users worldwide.

“We are going through a broad philosophical shift at the company,” said Zuckerberg, who eschewed his signature grey T-shirt for a dark suit and tie for his week on Capitol Hill.

The company's stock jumped 4.5 percent — its best single-day performance in two years — on Tuesday, signaling that investors were pleased with how the proceedings went. Shares dipped slightly at the opening bell on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Zuckerberg will take his explanations about what happened with Cambridge Analytica, how Facebook is dealing with fake news and Russian interference, the company's business model, how it works with third-party developers and much more to the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Facebook is one of Silicon Valley's largest technology employers, with almost 10,000 workers in the region at last count. Around the world, it has about 25,000. Zuckerberg has said it plans to hire thousands more cybersecurity workers to tackle data privacy issues, but that may be easier said than done.

 

In case you missed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's first of two days testifying before congressional committees, or just need a refresher of what the 33-year-old billionaire told lawmakers, check out the gallery above.

Zuckerberg testified before a joint Senate committee hearing Tuesday, answering questions about the Menlo Park-based company's handling of user data, the week after it increased its estimate of how many people had their data improperly accessed and harvested by the Donald Trump-connected political consultancy Cambridge Analytica to 87 million, from 50 million.

Senators grilled him on whether Facebook is a monopoly, how it ensures user privacy and how it plans to stop foreign meddling in elections around the globe via its platform, which has more than 2 billion users worldwide.

“We are going through a broad philosophical shift at the company,” said Zuckerberg, who eschewed his signature grey T-shirt for a dark suit and tie for his week on Capitol Hill.

The company's stock jumped 4.5 percent — its best single-day performance in two years — on Tuesday, signaling that investors were pleased with how the proceedings went. Shares dipped slightly at the opening bell on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Zuckerberg will take his explanations about what happened with Cambridge Analytica, how Facebook is dealing with fake news and Russian interference, the company's business model, how it works with third-party developers and much more to the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Facebook is one of Silicon Valley's largest technology employers, with almost 10,000 workers in the region at last count. Around the world, it has about 25,000. Zuckerberg has said it plans to hire thousands more cybersecurity workers to tackle data privacy issues, but that may be easier said than done.

 

 


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